Fisheries & Resource Management


©Marilyn McClelland

As befits an Assembly held in Canada's east coast, the sessions below explore the issues facing sustainable fisheries and integrates them fully into the broader food movement.

The natural resources essential to sustainable and just food systems are also examined.

 


NOTES OF THE SESSION
 Notes were taken by volunteers and are not for citation.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

First Nations Resource Management - Food Sovereignty in Action
Maximizing Return on Investments for Small-scale Processing Facilities

Seeking Netukulimk Film Screening and Indigenous circle meeting
F
ood Hubs – connecting producers with eaters across the value chain
Transitional Economies: Shifting the Paradigm with Forest and Freshwater Foods
Exploring the issue of "value" in sustainable fisheries


First Nations Resource Management - Food Sovereignty in Action

Presenters: Clifford Paul, Unama’ki Institute of Natural Resources; Sana Kavanagh, Mi’kmaw Conservation Group, The Confederacy of Mainland Mi’kmaq

Beginning with a screening of the short documentary 'Our Rightful Place', about the efforts to establish traditional Mi’kmaq management of moose in Unama’ki (Cape Breton), this session will discuss how First Nations in Atlantic Canada are building community food and economy security by taking active roles in managing the natural resources that their communities depend on. Speakers will provide examples of their work to support First Nations' equal participation in natural resource management and to enhance the use of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge in management processes. Discussion will explore ways to increase community participation in natural resource management processes and how this work strengthens regional food systems and food sovereignty.

Notes of the session


Maximizing Return on Investments for Small-scale Processing Facilities

Participatory Workshop - Presenters:  Jenna Stoner, Living Oceans Society; Rita Hansen Sterne, University of Guelph; Mike Bishop, Owner, Helen B’s Preserves; Thomas Barlow, Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers

Processing is often a bottle neck in local food supply chains. As such there are a growing number of small-scale processing plants popping up, but they have been met with their fair share of challenges one of which is how to effectively manage having infrastructure in place for food processing in the face of seasonal product availability. In this session, a diverse group shared first-hand experiences of food processing from both land and aquatic food systems and engaged in a brainstorm discussion to explore innovative ideas/models that could maximize the return on investments in small-scale processing facilities.

Notes of the session


Seeking Netukulimk Film Screening and Indigenous circle meeting

Participatory Workshop - Presenters:  Martha Stiegman, York University; Kerry Prospser, Paqtnkek Mi'kmaw Nation

A film screening of Seeking Netukulimk (22min), was followed by an interactive discussion with co-directors Martha Stiegman (York University) and Kerry Prosper (Paqtnkek Mikmaq Nation) about Mikmaq food systems and video-based participatory research.
Kerry Prosper is a passionate fisher and Mikmaq elder, who is teaching his grandchildren how to exercise their treaty rights by fishing eels. But those rights come with sacred responsibilities to care for the land and waters of Mikmaki. Seeking Netukulimk is a lyrical exploration of the traditional laws that govern fishing in the Mikmaq world, and some of the political battles that have been fought to defend them.

Notes of the session


Food Hubs – connecting producers with eaters across the value chain

Panel - Presenters: Justin Cantafio & Dave Adler, Off the Hook; Sally Miller, the Food Hub Project; Mathieu D’Astous, Really Local Harvest / La Récolte de Chez Nous; Franco Naccarato, Greenbelt Fund; Daniel Kanu, Food Matters Manitoba; Moe Garahan, Ottawa Food Hub; Peggy Bailie, Eat Local Sudbury

Food Hubs have emerged as an effective tool in rebuilding local food systems, integrating a values-based approach with a commitment to both a place and to its food producers. Across Canada, hubs are aggregating product and distributing it to a range of markets, addressing shared challenges of packaging, marketing, standards, volume and access. Food hub leaders from across Canada shared stories of their successes and challenges, from start up to expansion, from seafood to ground crops, with funding and regulations. Session Presenters included food hub innovators from across the country and active participation from session attendees was encouraged.

Notes of the session


Transitional Economies: Shifting the Paradigm with Forest and Freshwater Foods

Participatory Workshop - Presenters:  Meshan Sutherland, Fort Albany First Nation; Joseph Leblanc, True North Community Cooperative; Alexander Boulet, Federation of Ontario Naturalists

This session brought together three actionists in the areas of food sovereignty, land-use planning, community based research, and food activism to facilitate a discussion around the following premise:
In northern regions and forest-based communities, forest and freshwater foods and their ecosystems can act as a lynch-pin for transitional economic strategies seeking to move away from a global food system that fosters dependence and vulnerability, and towards locally based alternatives that promote independence and strengthen resilience.
Connections were made amongst fellow actionists to explore what role natural resource management, public health, conservation and re-skilling might play in transitioning to a new food paradigm.

Notes of the session


Exploring the issue of "value" in sustainable fisheries

Workshop - Presenters: Melanie Newell and Alen Newell, Chedabucto Bay Sustainable Fisheries Incorporated. Amanda Barney, Ecotrust Canada; Jim McIsaac, TBuck Suzuki. Moderator: Justin Cantafio, Ecology Action Centre.

Hear about the issues in defining "value" in both East and West coast sustainable fisheries work. Chedabucto Bay trap-caught shrimp have been harvested in Nova Scotia for 20 years using low impact fishing methods to ensure sustainability and qualityand now need to develop a more sustainable market for their unique product. Participants also heard about the documentation of the full suite of values, from economic to intangible, that wild capture commercial fishing brings to communities in Canada’s Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA). The moderator from the Ecology Action Centre introduced the session with highlights of their work with a Community Supported Fishery and regional value chains to support small-scale fisheries.

Notes of the session